Onshore facilities

Norway has a number of onshore facilities linked to fields and pipelines on the Norwegian shelf, from Kårstø in the south to Melkøya in the north. They meet current needs for transport, storage and processing of oil and gas from the fields they serve.
Norway has a number of onshore facilities linked to fields and pipelines on the Norwegian shelf, from Kårstø in the south to Melkøya in the north. They meet current needs for transport, storage and processing of oil and gas from the fields they serve.
Kollsnes Kårstø Melkøya Mongstad Nyhamna Sture Tjeldbergodden Vestprosess

Kollsnes gas processing plant

Øygarden municipality, Hordaland

Kollsnes receives rich gas, which is separated into dry gas and NGL. The gas is dewatered and compressed, then transported by pipeline via the Sleipner and Draupner platforms to continental Europe. The processing plant has a capacity of up to 143 million Sm3 rich gas per day. The export capacity is 143 million Sm3 dry gas per day or about 2.2 million tonnes NGL per year. NGL is transported to Mongstad via the Vestprosess pipeline.

 

Picture of the av gas processing plant at Kollsnes
Picture of the av gas processing plant at Kollsnes (Photo: Øyvind Sætre - Gassco)

Kårstø gas and condensate processing plant

Tysvær municipality, Rogaland

Kårstø receives rich gas and unstabilised condensate (light oil), which are separated into liquid products and dry gas. The dry gas is transported by pipeline to continental Europe. The liquid stream is separated into six different products and is shipped out on special carriers. The plant has a capacity of about 95 million Sm³ rich gas per day, 6.3 million tonnes wet gas per year and about 4.5 million tonnes condensate per year.

Picture of the gas and condensate processing plant at Kårstø
Picture of the gas and condensate processing plant at Kårstø (Photo: Øyvind Hagen -Gassco)

Melkøya LNG

Hammerfest municipality, Finnmark

The unprocessed wellstream from Snøhvit is transported through a 143-kilometre-long pipeline to the Melkøya facility for processing and shipping. Onshore, the condensate, water and CO2 are separated from the wellstream before the natural gas is chilled to liquid form (LNG) and stored in dedicated tanks. The pipeline capacity is 7.7 million Sm3 per year. The CO2 separated from the natural gas is returned to the Snøhvit field where it is injected into a formation below the oil and gas reservoirs.

Picture of the LNG plant at Melkøya
Picture of the LNG plant at Melkøya (Photo: Øyvind Hagen-Gassco)

Mongstad oil terminal

Lindås and Austrheim municipalities, Hordaland

Mongstad receives and handles crude oil delivered by tanker from a number of fields, including Gullfaks, Statfjord, Draugen, Norne, Åsgard and Heidrun, and is also the terminal for the oil pipelines from Troll B, Troll C, Fram, Kvitebjørn, Valemon, Gjøa and Vega. Mongstad has three jetties that can be used by vessels of up to 400 000 tonnes, and six rock caverns with a total capacity of 1.5 million Sm3 crude oil. The Mongstad site also houses the Mongstad refinery, a combined heat and power plant and the Technology Centre Mongstad (TCM), the world’s largest facility for testing and improving CO2 capture technologies.

Picture of the Mongstad refinery
Picture of the refinery at Mongstad (Photo: Øyvind Hagen - Statoil)

Nyhamna gas processing plant

Aukra municipality, Møre og Romsdal

The processing plant for gas from Ormen Lange is a conventional facility for dewatering, compression, gas export, separation of condensate, stabilisation, storage and fiscal metering of gas and condensate. The current capacity of the plant is 70 million Sm3 dry gas per day. The plant is being expanded so that it can also receive rich gas from the Polarled pipeline, which is under construction. The pipeline will transport gas from the Aasta Hansteen and Dvalin fields, and possible future field developments in the area.

Picture of the gas processing plant at Hyhamna
Picture of the gas processing plant at Nyhamna (Photo: Alice Berfall)

Gas plant expansion at Nyhamna

Gas plant expansion at Nyhamna

Sture terminal

Øygarden municipality, Hordaland

Oil and condensate from the fields Oseberg, Veslefrikk, Brage, Oseberg Sør, Oseberg Øst, Tune and Huldra arrive at the Sture terminal via a pipeline from Oseberg A. The terminal also receives oil from the fields Grane, Svalin, Edvard Grieg and Ivar Aasen through the Grane oil pipeline.

The Sture facility includes two jetties that can berth oil tankers up to 300 000 tonnes, five caverns for crude oil storage with a total capacity of 1 million Sm3, one LPG cavern with a capacity of 60 000 Sm3, and a ballast water cavern of 200 000 m3. A fractionation plant processes unstabilised crude from the Oseberg field into stable crude oil and LPG blend.

Picture of the Sture terminal
Picture of the terminal at Sture (Photo: Øyvind Hagen - Statoil)

Tjeldbergodden methanol plant

Aure municipality, Møre og Romsdal

The plant receives gas through the Haltenpipe system totalling about 0.7 billion Sm3 a year. This yields 830 000 tonnes of methanol. The Tjeldbergodden complex also includes an air separation plant. In addition, the company Tjeldbergodden Luftgassfabrikk DA operates a small fractionation and LNG plant with a capacity of 35 million Sm3 per year.

Picture of the methanol plant at Tjeldbergodden
Picture of the methanol plant at Tjeldbergodden (Photo: Harald Pettersen-Statoil)

Vestprosess

Lindås municipality, Hordaland

Unstabilised NGL is transported by a 56-kilometre pipeline from the Kollsnes plant via the Sture oil terminal to Mongstad, where it is processed. The first step is separation of naphtha and LPG. Naphtha is used as a raw material in the refinery, and LPG is fractionated in a separate plant. The fractionation products, propane and butane, are stored in caverns for subsequent export.

Onshore facilities in Norway

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Source: The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Onshore facilities in Norway
Source: The Norwegian Petroleum Directorate
Updated: 14.03.2017