Resources per sea area

The North Sea holds about 43 per cent of remaining resources. The distribution of the rest of the resources shows that there is 38 per cent left in the Barents Sea and 19 per cent left in the Norwegian Sea. A significant percentage of the expected remaining resources in the Barents Sea have yet to be proven.
The North Sea holds about 43 per cent of remaining resources. The distribution of the rest of the resources shows that there is 38 per cent left in the Barents Sea and 19 per cent left in the Norwegian Sea. A significant percentage of the expected remaining resources in the Barents Sea have yet to be proven.
North Sea Norwegian Sea Barents Sea

The North Sea is the powerhouse of the Norwegian petroleum activities, with 67 producing fields at the end of 2020. Production started on one field so far in 2020, Skogul, and production also started from the redeveloped Tor field. The Gyda field shut down production in 2020 after nearly 30 years, 10 years longer than estimated in the development plan.

There are 20 producing fields in the Norwegian Sea. One new field, Dvalin, came on stream so far in 2020. The Ærfugl field had its official start-up in November 2020 (for technical accounting-data purposes, the resources in Ærfugl were included in the Skarv field). There are two producing fields in the Barents Sea.

Download all resource account tables per 31.12.2020.

Remaining petroleum resources per sea area as of 31 December 2020

In million standard cubic metres oe

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

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Remaining petroleum resources per sea area as of 31 December 2020 – In million standard cubic metres oe

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North Sea

The resource accounts for the North Sea show that 166 million Sm3 o.e. was sold and delivered from this part of the shelf in 2020. Gross reserves increased by 71 million Sm3 o.e., before deducting production. The remaining reserves in the North Sea were reduced by 96 million Sm3 o.e. in 2020. At the end of the year, reserves constitute 2023 million Sm3 o.e.

The largest contribution to the increase in gross reserves comes from Breidablikk, which submitted a plan for development and operation (PDO) in 2020, for developing the 25/11-27 (F structure) and 25/8-4 (D structure) discoveries. In addition, the reserves on the Hod field have increased because of submission of a PDO to further develop the field. Reserves have also increased onseveral other fields such as Edvard Grieg, Sleipner Vest and Statfjord, while there was a reduction on Valhall.

The contingent resources in fields were reduced by 18 million Sm3 o.e. in 2020. The reduction is mainly caused by submission of the PDO to further develop the Hod field. Contingent resources in discoveries are reduced by 13 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year’s accounts. The reduction is due to submission of the PDO for Breidablikk, but the growth from new discoveries results in a limited reduction. Eight discoveries were made in the North Sea in 2020. The resource growth from seven of the discoveries is about 22 million Sm3 o.e.

The estimate for uundiscovered resources is 665 million Sm3 o.e. This is a reduction of 20 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year's resource accounts.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2020

Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2020

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2020 – Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.
Oseberg A
Oseberg A platform in the North Sea. Photo: Harald Pettersen, Equinor (Statoil)

Norwegian Sea

The resource accounts for the Norwegian Sea show that 54 million Sm3 o.e. were sold and delivered from this part of the shelf last year. At the same time, there is a reduction in the gross reserves of 9 million Sm3 o.e., before production is deducted. This entails a reduction in remaining reserves in the Norwegian Sea of 64 million Sm3 o.e. in 2020. At the end of the year, reserves constitute 428 million Sm3 o.e. The reduction in gross reserves is partly due to the fact that the reserves in Aasta Hansteen and Trestakk are reduced compared with last year’s accounts.

The contingent resources in fields were increased by 27 million Sm3 o.e. in 2020. The reason for this is that several fields have identified several measures to improve recovery, including e.g. drilling more wells. The estimate for contingent resources in discoveries has increased by 31 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year. Seven new discoveries were made in the Norwegian Sea in 2020, including the two largest discoveries on the shelf. Total resource growth from new discoveries is 54 million Sm3 o.e.

The estimate for undiscovered resources is 665 million Sm3 o.e., which is a reduction of 55 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year’s accounts.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2020

Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2020

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2020 – Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.
Skandi Mongstad, supply vessel at Norne
Picture from Norne FPSO in the Norwegian Sea. Photo: Harald Pettersen, Equinor (Statoil)

Barents Sea

The resource accounts for the Barents Sea show that 6 million Sm3 o.e. were sold and delivered from this part of the shelf last year. The gross reserves have been reduced by 8 million Sm3 o.e. before production is deducted. This entails a reduction in remaining reserves of 14 million Sm3 o.e. in 2020. At year-end, the reserves are 276 million Sm3 o.e. The reason for the reduction in gross reserves is that the reserves in the Snøhvit field have been reduced as a consequence of an update of the reservoir model.

The contingent resources in fields have increased by 3 million Sm3 o.e. and the contingent resources in discoveries are reduced by 15 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year’s accounts. The reason for this is reduced estimates of recoverable resources in several discoveries. In addition, the 7324/6-1 (Sputnik) discovery is assessed as an unlikely candidate for development, and it is therefore not included in the accounts. No discoveries were made in the Barents Sea in 2020.

The undiscovered resources in the Barents Sea include volumes in the Barents Sea south, south-east and north-east. The estimate for the undiscovered resources in 2020 is 2,505 million Sm3 o.e., which is unchanged compared with last year’s accounts.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2020

Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2020

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2020 – Oil and condensate are quoted in million standard cubic metres (Sm³). NGL is quoted in million tonnes, and gas is quoted in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to Sm³ is 1.9. Total oil equivalents are stated in million Sm³ o.e., 1000 Sm³ gas = 1 Sm³ o.e.
Updated: 13.04.2021