Resources per sea area

The North Sea contains about 44 per cent of the remaining resources. The distribution of the rest of the resources shows that there is 36 per cent left in the Barents Sea and 20 per cent left in the Norwegian Sea. A large portion of the expected resources that remain in the Barents Sea have not yet been proven.
The North Sea contains about 44 per cent of the remaining resources. The distribution of the rest of the resources shows that there is 36 per cent left in the Barents Sea and 20 per cent left in the Norwegian Sea. A large portion of the expected resources that remain in the Barents Sea have not yet been proven.
North Sea Norwegian Sea Barents Sea

The North Sea is the powerhouse in the Norwegian petroleum activities, with 66 producing fields at the end of 2017. Four new fields, Gina Krog, Flyndre, Sindre and Byrding, started producing in 2017. There are 17 producing fields in the Norwegian Sea. One new field, Maria, started producing in 2017. There are two producing fields in the Barents Sea.

Download all resource account tables per 31.12.2017.

Remaining petroleum resources per sea area as of 31 December 2017

In million standard cubic metres oe

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print illustration Download data Remaining petroleum resources per sea area as of 31 December 2017 Download PDF Download as image (PNG)

Remaining petroleum resources per sea area as of 31 December 2017 – In million standard cubic metres oe

North Sea

The resource accounts for the North Sea show that 168 million Sm3 o.e. were sold and delivered from this part of the Norwegian shelf over the past year. Gross reserves increased by 118 million Sm3 o.e, before deducting production. This means that the reserves that remain in the North Sea were reduced by 50 million Sm3 o.e. in 2017.

The increase in gross reserves can be explained by the fact that PDOs were submitted for 25/1-11 R Skogul, the Snorre Expansion Project, Valhall West Flank and Yme. Reserves also increased on a number of fields, such as Johan Sverdrup and Balder.

Contingent resources in fields increased by 31 million Sm3 o.e. in 2017 due to the identification of additional recoverable resources in fields. There are also plans in place to redevelop the Frigg, Northeast Frigg and Odin fields. Contingent resources in discoveries have been reduced by 2 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year's accounts, because the resources in 25/1-11 R Skogul have been transferred to reserves. Five of the discoveries in last year's accounts are also considered not to be commercial, and are therefore not included in the accounts. Two new discoveries were made in the North Sea in 2017, and resource growth from these discoveries totals about 4 million Sm3 o.e.

The resource estimate for the unproven resources was updated in 2017. The expected value is estimated at 725 million Sm3 o.e., which represents an increase of 25 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year's accounts.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2017

Oil, condensate and total oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic metres. NGL is given in million tonnes, and gas is given in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2017

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the North Sea as of 31.12.2017 – Oil, condensate and total oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic metres. NGL is given in million tonnes, and gas is given in billion standard cubic metres. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.
Oseberg A
Oseberg A platform in the North Sea. Photo: Harald Pettersen, Equinor (Statoil)

Norwegian Sea

The resource accounts for the Norwegian Sea show that 60 million Sm3 o.e. were sold and delivered from this part of the Norwegian shelf over the past year. At the same time, gross reserves increased by 109 million Sm3 o.e, before deducting production. This entails an increase in remaining reserves in the Norwegian Sea of 48 million Sm3 o.e. in 2017.

The increase in gross reserves is e.g. due to the fact that PDOs have been submitted for 6406/12-3S (Fenja), Bauge and Ærfugl in Skarv, and that the resources slated for development have been transferred to reserves. A PDO exemption has also been granted for 6706/12-2 Snefrid Nord, which is now part of the reserve base on the Aasta Hansteen field. Reserves also increased on several fields, such as Åsgard, Ormen Lange and Heidrun.

Contingent resources in fields were reduced by 46 million Sm3 o.e. in 2017. The reason for this is e.g. that a decision has been made to develop Ærfugl in Skarv. The estimate for contingent resources in discoveries was reduced by seven million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year’s accounts. The most important reasons for this are the submissions of development plans for 6406/12-3 S (Fenja), 6407/8-6 Snilehorn (now the Bauge field) and 6706/12-2 Snefrid Nord.

Three new discoveries were made in the Norwegian Sea in 2017. The discoveries are minor, and total resource growth is about six million Sm3 o.e. The estimate for unproven resources is 740 million Sm3 o.e., which constitutes a reduction of 35 million Sm3 o.e. from 2016.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2017

Oil, condensate and total oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic meters. NGL is given in million tonnes, and gas is given in billion standard cubic meters. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2017

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Norwegian Sea as of 31.12.2017 – Oil, condensate and total oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic meters. NGL is given in million tonnes, and gas is given in billion standard cubic meters. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.
Skandi Mongstad, supply vessel at Norne
Picture from Norne FPSO in the Norwegian Sea. Photo: Harald Pettersen, Equinor (Statoil)

Barents Sea

The resource accounts for the Barents Sea show that 9 million Sm3 o.e. were sold and delivered from this part of the Norwegian shelf over the past year. At the same time, gross reserves increased by 90 million Sm3 o.e, before deducting production. This entails an increase in remaining reserves in the Barents Sea of 81 million Sm3 o.e. in 2017.

The increase in gross reserves is due to the fact that a PDO has been submitted for 7220/8-1 Johan Castberg.

Contingent resources in fields have been reduced by 3 million Sm3 o.e. compared with last year’s accounts. The estimate for contingent resources in discoveries has been reduced by 90 million Sm3 o.e. The reason for this is that a PDO has been submitted for 7220/8-1 Johan Castberg.

Six new discoveries were made in the Barents Sea in 2017. Resource growth is about 23 million Sm3 o.e. Three of the discoveries are considered not to be commercial for development, and are therefore not included in the accounts.

The unproven resources in the Barents Sea include volumes in the southern, southeastern and northern Barents Sea. The new area in the northeastern Barents Sea following the demarcation line agreement between Norway and Russia is included for the first time this year. The 2017 estimate for unproven resources is 2 535 million Sm3 o.e. This is an increase of 1 140 million Sm3 o.e. compared with 2016. The reason for this considerable change from 2016 is the new evaluation of the northern Barents Sea.

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2017

Oil, condensate and sum oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic meters. NGL is given in million tonnes and gas is given in billion standard cubic meters. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.

Source: Norwegian Petroleum Directorate

Print table Download data Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2017

Original recoverable petroleum resources in the Barents Sea as of 31.12.2017 – Oil, condensate and sum oil equivalents are given in million standard cubic meters. NGL is given in million tonnes and gas is given in billion standard cubic meters. The conversion factor for NGL in tonnes to standard cubic metres is 1.9.
Updated: 16.05.2018