The government's revenues

The government’s total net cash flow is expected to increase in 2017 compared to 2016. Current assumptions on the government's total net cash flow from the petroleum industry, including tax, dividend from Statoil and various fees, is estimated to NOK 180 billion (2018-NOK). The more than 40 % increase in revenues is due to higher revenues following higher oil and gas prices.
The government’s total net cash flow is expected to increase in 2017 compared to 2016. Current assumptions on the government's total net cash flow from the petroleum industry, including tax, dividend from Statoil and various fees, is estimated to NOK 180 billion (2018-NOK). The more than 40 % increase in revenues is due to higher revenues following higher oil and gas prices.
Taxes SDFI Dividends Fees and other taxes

When the first production licences were awarded in the mid-1960s, hardly anyone realised what the industry would mean for the Norwegian economy. Fifty years later, it is more important than ever.

The industry plays a vital role in the Norwegian economy and the financing of the Norwegian welfare state. The oil and gas sector is Norway's largest measured in terms of value added, government revenues, investments and export value. Long-term perspective in the management of the government's petroleum revenues ensures that they benefit Norwegian society as a whole, and that future generations will benefit from Norway’s petroleum wealth. This has been a key principle in developing the financial and legal framework for the sector.

Since production started on the Norwegian continental shelf in the early 1970s, petroleum activities have contributed to about  NOK 13 500 billion in current NOK to Norway’s GDP. This does not include related service and supply industries. Yet so far, under half of the estimated recoverable resources on the Norwegian shelf have been produced and sold.

Macroeconomic indicators for the petroleum sector, 2017

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The service and supply industry is not included (Source: National Accounts, National Budget 2018)

One of the overall principles of Norway’s management of its petroleum resources is that exploration, development and production must result in maximum value creation for society, and that revenues must accrue to the Norwegian state and thus benefit society as a whole. The main reason for this is the extraordinary returns that can be obtained by producing petroleum resources. Since these resources belong to society as a whole, the Norwegian state secures a large share of the value creation through taxation and the system known as the State’s Direct Financial Interest (SDFI) in the petroleum industry.

The expected net government cash flow from petroleum activities (in billion 2018-NOK)

 

2017 2018
Taxes 71,8 84,2
Environmental taxes and area fees 7,0 6,9
Net cash flow from SDFI 91,7 77,4
Statoil dividend 9,3 14,5
The net government cash flow 179,8 183

Source: The Ministry of Finance - National Budget 2018

Norway’s tax revenues from petroleum activities are estimated to around NOK 72 billion in 2017. The net cash flow from direct ownership in fields through the SFDI system is estimated to NOK 92 billion. The government has additional income from fees and Statoil dividend. Estimated total net cash flow from the petroleum industry in 2017 is NOK 180 billion (2018-NOK).

This is a significant increase since 2016 and is caused mainly by increased income due to higher oil and gas prices. The total revenues from the industry amounted to around 11 % in 2016, and this share is expected to increase to 14 % in 2017. The net government cash flow is expected to be around NOK 183 billion in 2018.

The net government cash flow from petroleum activities, 1971-2018

Updated: 12.10.2017

2017 and 2018 are preliminary numbers from the National Budget 2018. Paid taxes are adjusted for repayments and numbers are inflated using CPI Norway.

Source: Ministry of Finance, Statistics Norway

Print illustration Download data The net government cash flow from petroleum activities, 1971-2018 Download PDF Download as image (PNG)

The net government cash flow from petroleum activities, 1971-2018 – 2017 and 2018 are preliminary numbers from the National Budget 2018. Paid taxes are adjusted for repayments and numbers are inflated using CPI Norway.

Government revenues from petroleum activities are transferred to the Government Pension Fund Global, which at the end of 2016 had holdings with a total value of NOK 7 510 billion. Under the fiscal rule, transfers can be made to the fiscal budget from the Fund to finance important public goods without drawing on the Fund’s capital. In 2017, about one in seven NOK spent over the fiscal budget will come from the Government Pension Fund Global.

The oil and gas sector is Norway's largest measured in terms of value added, government revenues, investments and export value

Macroeconomic indicators for the petroleum sector, 1971-2017

Source: Statistics Norway (National accounts), Ministry of Finance (The national budget 2018)

Print illustration Download data Macroeconomic indicators for the petroleum sector, 1971-2017 Download PDF Download as image (PNG)

Macroeconomic indicators for the petroleum sector, 1971-2017

Tax revenues

The petroleum taxation system is based on the rules for ordinary company taxation and are set out in the Petroleum Taxation Act (Act of 13 June 1975 No. 35 relating to the taxation of subsea petroleum deposits, etc). Because of the extraordinary returns on production of petroleum resources, the oil companies are subject to an additional special tax. The current ordinary company tax rate is 24 %, and the special tax rate is 54 %. In 2017, Norway’s tax revenues from petroleum activities is estimated to about NOK 72 billion.

See article about the petroleum tax system for more information.

The State’s Direct Financial Interest

The State’s Direct Financial Interest (SDFI) is a system under which the Norwegian state owns holdings in a number of oil and gas fields, pipelines and onshore facilities. For oil and gas fields, the proportion is determined when production licences are awarded, and varies from field to field. As one of several owners, the government covers its share of investments and costs, and receives a corresponding share of the income from production licences.

The SDFI system was established on 1 January 1985. Before this, the Norwegian government only had ownership interests in production licences through Statoil, which was wholly state-owned. From 1985, these were split in two: one part became the State’s Direct Financial Interest (SDFI) and the other part remained with Statoil.

When Statoil was listed on the stock exchange in 2001, the responsibility for managing the SDFI portfolio was transferred from Statoil to a new state-owned management company, Petoro. Today, the state has direct financial interests in 193 production licences, 34 producing fields and holdings in 15 joint ventures that own pipelines and onshore facilities.

Net cash flow from SDFI in 2017 is estimated to NOK 92 billion.

Oseberg A
Oseberg A platform (Photo: Harald Pettersen, Statoil)

Revenue from direct state ownership in Statoil

The Norwegian state owns 67 % of the shares in Statoil, and receives dividends in the same way as other shareholders. In 2017, expected dividend paid to the state is NOK 9 billion.

Area fees and environmental taxes

Area fees

The area fee is intended to ensure that awarded acreage is explored efficiently. In 2017, a total of NOK 1,4 billion is expected paid in area fees.

Environmental taxes

The carbon tax and the NOx tax are important environmental taxes in the petroleum sector. The petroleum industry is also included in the emissions trading system. Companies that are licensees on the Norwegian shelf must therefore purchase emission allowances if their greenhouse gas emissions exceed their allocated amount for the year.

Norway was one of the first countries in the world to introduce a carbon tax, in 1991. This is levied on all combustion of gas, oil and diesel in petroleum operations on the continental shelf and on releases of CO2 and natural gas, in accordance with the CO2 Tax Act on Petroleum Activites. For 2017, the tax rate is NOK 1,04 per standard cubic metre of gas or per litre of oil or condensate. For combustion of natural gas, this is equivalent to NOK 445 per tonne of CO2. For emissions of natural gas, the tax rate is NOK 7,16 per standard cubic metre.

The expected total tax levied is NOK 5,4 billion in 2017.

See article about emissions to air from petroleum activities for more information.

Updated: 13.10.2017